Browsing All Posts filed under »Inside Labour Column«

Women’s Day and celebrations of patronage

August 12, 2016


In South Africa we should stop dressing up celebrations of patronage — and worse — as examples of gender equality. This fact was highlighted in a dramatic way by a demonstration at the announcement of the recent local government election results.

Quotas do not equality make

August 7, 2016


Despite a clear South African Constitutional Court decision last month on quotas and equal rights, much election propaganda on the topic, leading up to the August 3 poll, was characterised by misinformation, distortions and downright lies.

More turbulence seems to lie ahead for SA

August 1, 2016


Wednesday, August 3 will be the climax of probably the most fractious and bitter political campaigning, certainly at a local level, that South Africa has seen since 1994. And, whatever the outcome, it will have repercussions throughout society.

A Turkish lesson for democrats everywhere

July 23, 2016


The latest snub to the rule of law in South Africa came this week with the sacking of SABC journalists by management in flagrant disregard of the ruling made by the Independent Communications Authority. It follows a litany of questionable official actions, comments and downright disregard for the judicial system, the labour laws and, in […]

The only antidote to public confusion

July 10, 2016


We seem today to be surrounded by much deliberate obfuscation of critical issues by official sources and, all too often, by a swirl of lies, innuendo and fear mongering. The antidote is honest journalism that encourages critical thinking.

Brexit, nationalism & xenophobia

July 10, 2016


The looming exit — Brexit — of certainly England and Wales from the European Union (EU) — should not overly concern South Africa economically or politically. Certainly not in the short term. But never has the slogan, workers of the world unite, seemed more appropriate.

Nothing new in ANC authoritarianism

June 24, 2016


Around the world, essential public services are under pressure as local, state and national governments seek to cut costs. But such services should surely never be driven by the profit motive? So who is to blame and what should we do?