Browsing All Posts filed under »Inside Labour Column«

Why trade unions are even more relevant today

June 27, 2015

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As the micro chip rvolution continues to gain pace, trade unions — as democratic organisations of the sellers of labour — are probably more relevant now than they have ever been. Especially for anyone who feels that democracy is an important concept.

South Africa on a “slippery slope”

June 24, 2015

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Is South Africa on the slippery slope to authoritarianism? It’s a valid question to ask since both the Cosatu and the national constitutions have been undermined. And they were both, in their own way, flag bearers of the democratic promise of the new South Africa.

Mired in a parochial midset & ignorant of history

May 31, 2015

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The parochial mindset of nationally-based companies and trade unions reveals asn ignorance of economic history, including the fact that shareholder companies — a cornerstone of our system — were banned in Britain for 105 years because of their inherent tendency to be corrupt.

Don’t blame workers for managerial incompetence

May 26, 2015

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Don’t blame workers for poor management. And feel some sympathy for any competent managers, whether in a large school, a government department, or parastatal who often have to deal with a legacy of maladministration, all too often accompanied by levels of corruption.

No worker joy in SA public sector pay deal

May 25, 2015

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By comparing last week the pay and conditions of nurses and teachers to those of cabinet ministers and MPs I seem to have touched a raw nerve, especially among paramedics and fire fighters. They too have concerns — and not only about money.

Of pay, politicians & nurses

May 17, 2015

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Some critics of South African nurses and teachers who have left to work abroad have dubbed them unpatriotic. They are not. They are part of the international army of migrant labour. In any event, since capital knows no boundaries nor should labour accept any borders .

Wage gaps disfigure SA public service

May 10, 2015

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A wage and welfare gap is one of the prime problems in the SA public service. It's an example of maladministration for which workers should not be blamed. And some sympathy should be extended to competent managers who have to deal with a legacy of maladministration, often coupled with levels of corruption.

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